Beaulieu, Dr. Norman

2005 Alberta Technology, Recipient

Renowned Scientist Revolutionizes Wireless Communication

Not many scientists get the honour of having a technique or procedure named after them. But when international researchers use an ingenious mathematical method called the “Beaulieu series” to compute the outage and coverage of cellular telephone systems it’s one more indication of the profound impact Dr. Norman Beaulieu has had on the field of wireless communications.

A Leader in his Field

Dr. Beaulieu is a leader in the analysis and modeling of wireless communications systems. He has made groundbreaking contributions on a number of fronts, from performance analysis of wireless systems and modeling of fading channels to novel electrical pulse shapes for data modems. His work has provided solutions to fundamental problems abandoned by others as too difficult and has opened doors to subsequent research by scientists around the world.

His results and techniques have been used by researchers in other fields including environmental management, resource economics, agriculture and commerce. Since coming to Alberta in 2000 as iCORE Research Chair in Broadband Wireless Communications, Dr. Beaulieu has filed seven patent applications on behalf of the University of Alberta for important inventions in wireless systems. During that time his leadership of the iCORE Wireless Communications Laboratory has established Edmonton and Alberta as one of the strongest wireless research centres in the world.

His work has provided solutions to fundamental problems abandoned by others as too difficult and has opened doors to subsequent research by scientists around the world.

Outstanding Accomplishments

In 2001, Dr. Beaulieu was appointed Canada Research Chair in Broadband Wireless Communications, making him likely the only researcher in Canada to hold two major chairs. Dr. Beaulieu is also the only resident Canadian to become Editor-in-Chief of the world’s premier research journal in communications, the IEEE Transactions on Communications.

Under his leadership, the journal prospered to such an extent he was invited to serve a second term. He has also served in editorial positions or on the board with other publications of the IEEE, the largest professional engineering organization in the world.

Dr. Beaulieu has received numerous awards for his contributions to science, including the 2004 K.Y. Lo Medal of the Engineering Institute of Canada for his international leadership in science and engineering. This year he received the Thomas W. Eadie Medal from the Royal Society of Canada in recognition of major contributions to engineering and applied science. He was also awarded the E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship, which was given each year in Canada to only four researchers in all areas of natural sciences and engineering.